So much to do, so little time

 Updated: 

Editor’s note: The event featured in this article occurred in 2017, but you’ll find other great happenings on our Events page.

There is so much going on in Central Arkansas in the coming week that it barely fits into seven days. Whether you’re in the mood for art, history, music, food, shopping or all of the above, we’ve got something to occupy you.

Appreciate the arts

A new exhibit of early works by photographer Ansel Adams and works on paper by modernist Herman Meril opens Friday, January 27 at the Arkansas Arts Center. Opening weekends tend to be pretty hairy, but if you feel like braving the crowds these are two can’t-miss exhibits. And if you don’t? No worries, because they’re both on display until mid-April. On Tuesday, January 31 the River Rhapsodies Chamber Music Series of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra presents a program featuring Strauss and Debussy at the Clinton Presidential Center. The show starts at 7 p.m., and tickets are $23 for general admission and $10 for students and active military. Also on Tuesday, the ESSE Purse Museum, in conjunction with the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, debuts a new exhibit celebrating both Black History Month and Women’s History Month. “Reflections: Images and Objects from African-American Women, 1891-1987” features artifacts from public and private collections and illuminates African-American women’s experience through fashion, material culture, photography and ephemera. Admission to the museum is $10, $8 for seniors and military.

And your sweethearts

jewelsValentine’s Day is just a couple weeks away, so here are two unique opportunities to find a little something special for your special someone. On Saturday and Sunday January 28-29, South Main Creative is hosting a vintage costume jewelry trunk show offers a sneak peek at more than 200 estate pieces spanning nearly the entire 20th century. A “wine and snacks” reception will take place on Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m., and the show continues Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Odds are pretty good that you know someone who likes flowers. Did you know that flowers have a language of their own, with meanings spelled out by the choice of blossoms included in an arrangement? Learn all about this Victorian method of communicating coded messages in a free program on Monday, January 30 at noon at the Main Branch of the Central Arkansas Library System. You’ll even get to make your own bouquet! On Saturday, February 4, the HeART of the Bar handmade gift market returns to South on Main from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Craft cocktails, brunch treats, a photo (erm, kissing?) booth and a raffle are added enticements to this fun opportunity to connect with local artisans.

jewels

Foodlanthropy

One of Arkansas’s tastiest fundraising events returns to the Statehouse Convention Center on Sunday, January 29th from 4 to 7 p.m. Soup Sunday, a program of Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, is celebrating its 36th anniversary this year, as well as 40 years of AACF. Featured chef Chris MacMillan of Boulevard Bread Company along with more than 40 other restaurants will be cooking up more soup (and breads, and desserts…) than you can shake a spoon at. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 after 5 p.m. on January 27. Check out the menu here and start making your game plan now (hint: it should probably include skipping lunch).

Legacies and learning

On Wednesday, February 1 at noon in the Ron Robinson Theater, the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies and the Clinton School for Public Service are teaming up to present a joint Legacies & Lunch and Arkansas Sounds program featuring the induction of the latest honorees on the UALR Anderson Institute on Race & Ethnicity’s Civil Rights Heritage Trail and a live performance of music of civil rights music. On the following day, the final program of Harding University‘s American Studies Institute Distinguished Lecture Series, on Thursday, February 2, will present Ruby Bridges, who initiated the desegregation of New Orleans public schools in 1960 as an elementary student. Bridges was the subject of Normal Rockwell’s 1964 painting “The Problem We All Live With,” which appeared in “Look” magazine is considered an iconic image of the civil rights movement. Bridges has dedicated her life to ensuring equal educational opportunities for all children. The free program starts at 7:30 p.m. in Harding’s Benson Auditorium; no tickets are necessary.