Tipi Talks by Grammy-Nominated Musician John Two Hawks

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John Two Hawks (photo by Peggy Hill)

The Museum of Native American History in Bentonville will host its Tipi Talks series with Grammy-nominated musician John Two Hawks at 5:30 p.m. beginning this Saturday, March 28 in the Great Room of the museum.

Now, if you’re wondering about the spelling of the word “tipi” and think I might have meant to spell it “tepee” or “teepee,” then we have something in common. Because that’s what I thought when information about this “tipi” talk event first popped up in my inbox. I grew up with the word “teepee” to mean a conical tent made of animal skins and wood poles used by American Indians as a dwelling.

I asked Charlotte Buchannan-Yale, museum director, about the use of the word “tipi” and she said that is how the Lakota spell it. See, we’ve learned something already (or at least some of us have). So just imagine what we’ll find out from the series.

Tipi Talks is a monthly gathering at the museum that explores interesting topics pertaining to contemporary Native American culture and history. They are meant to be a relaxed, enjoyable evening of sharing, laughing and learning. As well as being a Grammy-nominated recording artist, John Two Hawks is known as a wonderful teacher and speaker with a wealth of knowledge about American Indian culture.

His first talk scheduled for this Saturday is titled “To Make a Voice– Native American Flute Music”. Two Hawks will bring dozens of flutes, drums, and other traditional Native American instruments, and will share his knowledge of their historical and contemporary uses. A virtuoso Native Flute player himself, he will perform a few songs as part of the program. His goal is to impart a deeper understanding of the rich musical history and culture of American Indian people.

Dates for future Tipi Talks in the series are April 18, May 30 and June 13. For more information: 479-273-2456 or 479-253-1732 and visit www.monah.us or www.johntwohawks.com. The museum is located at 202 SW “O” St. It is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and has free admission.